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Author Archive for Brian Cronin – Page 3

Comic Legends: Did a Paramedic Seriously Lift Mjolnir?

Comic Legends: Did a Paramedic Seriously Lift Mjolnir?

Welcome to Comic Book Legends Revealed! This is the six hundred and sixty-fourth week where we examine comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

Click here for Part 1 of this week’s legends. Click here for Part 2 of this week’s legends.

COMIC LEGEND:

There is a panel of a paramedic picking up Thor’s hammer.

STATUS:

False

In this week’s episode of The X-Files, there was a very funny episode about the concept of the Mandela Effect (or the Mengele Effect in the episode itself, which suggests that people forgot that the Mandela Effect was really the Mengele Effect).

From the website, Know Your Meme, here is a definition of the Mandela Effect…

The Mandela Effect refers to a phenomenon in which a large number of people share false memories of past events, referred to as confabulation in psychiatry. Some have speculated that the memories are caused by parallel universes spilling into our own, while others explain the phenomenon as a failure of collective memory.

In the world of comic book fandom, probably the most famous example is a panel people insist that they’ve seen of a paramedic picking up Thor’s hammer. The panel became a major issue when people online were arguing (shocker, I know) about who was better, Thor or Superman, and people kept referencing that panel to show that picking up the hammer wasn’t that big of deal.

Anyhow, the panel doesn’t exist.

However, the closest I’ve seen to something that would at least explain why people would THINK that it is existed would be in Dan Jurgens and Andy Kubert’s run on Thor. In Thor #34, Thor is fighting Gladiator and is separated from his hammer and is then punched to Earth, where he turns into his alter ego at the time, which was paramedic Jake Olson…

The next issue, Jake’s partner, Christine Collins, appears to pick up the hammer, but in reality, she uses Jake’s own hands to pick up and hit the hammer, thus transforming him back into Thor.

But it sort of looks like she is picking it up. However, Christine Collins was actually the Enchantress in disguise anyways, so she wasn’t really a paramedic.

Anyhow, that’s the likely source of a panel that does not exist.

Another possibility is a bit where Eric Masterson picked up Thor’s hammer before Thor merged with him…

Yet another possibility is this moment in DC vs. Marvel #4, where Wonder Woman picks up the hammer and gives it to Thor…

It is sometimes cropped like this…

So yeah, it is not a real thing. Never happened. I am sorry to dash some dreams here.


Check out my latest Movie Legends Revealed – Did the Wachowskis risk their entire initial budget for the Matrix on just the opening scene to get Warner Bros. to fund a bigger budget?


OK, that’s it for this week!

Thanks to the Grand Comics Database for this week’s covers! And thanks to Brandon Hanvey for the Comic Book Legends Revealed logo!

Feel free (heck, I implore you!) to write in with your suggestions for future installments! My e-mail address is cronb01@aol.com. And my Twitter feed is http://twitter.com/brian_cronin, so you can ask me legends there, as well!

Here’s my most recent book, Why Does Batman Carry Shark Repellent? The cover is by Kevin Hopgood (the fellow who designed War Machine’s armor).

batshark

If you want to order a copy, ordering it here gives me a referral fee.

Follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter and on Facebook (also, feel free to share Comic Book Legends Revealed on our Facebook page!). Not only will you get updates when new blog posts show up on both Twitter and Facebook, but you’ll get some original content from me, as well!

Here’s my book of Comic Book Legends (130 legends. — half of them are re-worked classic legends I’ve featured on the blog and half of them are legends never published on the blog!).

The cover is by artist Mickey Duzyj. He did a great job on it…

If you’d like to order it, you can use the following code if you’d like to send me a bit of a referral fee…

Was Superman a Spy?: And Other Comic Book Legends Revealed

See you all next week!

The post Comic Legends: Did a Paramedic Seriously Lift Mjolnir? appeared first on CBR.

When Did Black Panther’s Costume First Become Made out of Vibranium?

When Did Black Panther’s Costume First Become Made out of Vibranium?

In “When We First Met”, we spotlight the various characters, phrases, objects or events that eventually became notable parts of comic lore, like the first time someone said, “Avengers Assemble!” or the first appearance of Batman’s giant penny or the first appearance of Alfred Pennyworth or the first time Spider-Man’s face was shown half-Spidey/half-Peter. Stuff like that.

Reader Chaim K. wrote in to ask:

Assuming that the MCU movies are true to the comics in this regard, when did the Black Panther’s costume become some vibranium-laced super-armor? I’d read Marvel Comics for a long time in the 80’s and 90’s and as far as I recall, it was simple cloth.

As Chaim notes, in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Black Panther’s costume being made out of a sort of vibranium-cloth mesh is a huge part of the character, making him protected from a lot of situations that would otherwise result in him getting injured.

However, in the old days. Black Panther’s costume was simply made out of ceremonial cloth. This was shown when he first had his own solo feature and his costume would be torn up on pretty much every other cover (it DOES look really cool, to be fair)…

So the question at first is simply whether the vibranium costume WAS an invention for the Marvel Cinematic Universe or not. The answer to that is nope, it was originally a comic book thing.

Okay, so when did it first show up in comic books?

That would be in 1998’s Black Panther #1, the beginning of Christopher Priest’s epic run on Black Panther for Marvel Knights…

Here it is in action in that first issue…

It’s interesting to note, really, how much of what we know of Black Panther’s history was first introduced in the late 1990s in Christopher Priest’s run. The Dora Milaje, for instance, debuted during his run. Really, it is surprising that it took until the late 1990s for someone to work Vibranium into the Panther’s costume. One of the whole deals about Wakanda is the fact that it IS the biggest producers of Vibranium in the world, so it makes sense that he would work the material into his costume for the sake of protecting him.

Not only that, but Priest also came up with the idea of using the Vibranium in his suit to do other stuff, like allow him to jump out of building and land on his feet, allowing the Vibranium in his soles to absorb the impact…

Anyhow, since that point, it’s been a pretty consistent part of the Black Panther’s wardrobe (as, well, obviously, once you add a bulletproof suit to your setup, it doesn’t really make sense to go away from it).

Thanks for the suggestion, Chaim! If anyone else has a suggestion for a notable comic book first that you’d like to know, drop me a line at brianc@cbr.com!

The post When Did Black Panther’s Costume First Become Made out of Vibranium? appeared first on CBR.

The Mystery of Quasar’s Operation: Galactic Storm Issue Numbering

The Mystery of Quasar’s Operation: Galactic Storm Issue Numbering

Comic Book Questions Answered – where I answer whatever questions you folks might have about comic books (feel free to e-mail questions to me at brianc@cbr.com).

Reader Jason R. wrote in to ask:

What’s the story with the different numbering between direct edition and newsstand version of Marvel’s “Quasar” during the Operation Galactic Storm storyline?

In 1992, Marvel had their biggest multi-chapter crossover ever (not counting stuff like Secret Wars II or Inferno that just had books tie into the main event) with a stunning 19-part crossover between all of the titles involving Marvel’s Avengers and character who were Avengers, so Avengers, Avengers West Coast, Captain America, Thor, Iron Man, Wonder Man and Quasar.

The Quasar tie-in issues were Quasar #32-34. However, as Jason notes, when the books came out on the newsstand, they were numbered #1-3 instead of Quasar #32-34.

So, what’s up with that?

The answer is actually pretty simple. Quasar, you see, had become a direct-market only title by 1991 (it just didn’t sell enough to warrant continuing sending the book to newsstands). Marvel did that with most of their lower-selling titles around that time. Pretty much just their most popular titles would be sent to newsstands (that, plus newer titles, as they would at least give the new titles a chance at finding a newsstand audience).

The issue, of course, was that they were now doing a massive crossover involving almost entirely books that were available on newsstands – except Quasar. So for the newsstand-only readers, they were, in effect, not going to have a chance to read the entire crossover unless they went to a direct market resource.

Their solution was to release the three tie-in issues of Quasar as three “special” newsstand editions, Quasar #1-3 (they couldn’t just send just those three issues to newsstands, so they would have to do technically a new series – they COULD have said it was Quasar Special #32-34, but I imagine that they just figured it would sell better if they called it #1-3).

Amusingly, I believe that they offered the Quasar Specials to the direct market, as well, if they wanted them. I imagine that not many stores ordered them (as, again, they were literally just the same stories as Quasar #32-34). Amusingly enough, though, around this time, Marvel was breaking in a new printer and there were a few errors on some of the titles, with “newsstand” editions printed of a few books that were only direct market releases. So I believe that there are actually some post-Quasar #34 issues that had UPC codes on them (which direct market titles didn’t have back then).

An interesting question is Wonder Man. Like I noted, new series appeared on newsstands at first, and Wonder Man definitely appeared on newsstands for their first few issues, but as far as I can tell, it came off of the newsstands for a few issues, but then went back to the newsstand for the Operation: Galactic Storm tie-ins.

So there ya go, Jason!

Thanks for the question, Jason! If anyone ELSE has a question they’d like to see me address, drop me a line at brianc@cbr.com!

The post The Mystery of Quasar’s Operation: Galactic Storm Issue Numbering appeared first on CBR.

Comic Legends: How Beetle Bailey Was Forced to Transform Miss Buxley

Comic Legends: How Beetle Bailey Was Forced to Transform Miss Buxley

Welcome to Comic Book Legends Revealed! This is the six hundred and sixty-fourth week where we examine comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

Click here for Part 1 of this week’s legends.

COMIC LEGEND:

Mort Walker was forced to change Miss Buxley’s appearance in Beetle Bailey.

STATUS:

True

Mort Walker passed away this weekend at 94 years old. Walker was the famous cartoonist behind Beetle Bailey and (with Dik Browne) its popular spin-off strip, Hi and Lois. Walker was a champion of the comic book art form. He founded the Cartoon Art Museum in the 1970s. He was a great lover of comic art and a vocal supporter.

However, it is difficult to discuss Walker without talking about how irascible he was, as well. This is not a shot at the guy, as he was very open about this side of his personality. He embraced it fully. Over the years, Walker would come up with racy Beetle Bailey strip ideas that he knew would never be approved by his syndicate. He would sketch them out anyways to amuse himself and his friends. I featured this in a Comic Book Legends Revealed years ago (it was even collected into a book in Sweden, where they are more tolerant of racy stuff).

Walker’s love of racy characters, though, ended up causing a bit of a problem with the introduction of a new secretary for General Halftrack in 1971 named Miss Buxley.

Right away, Halftrack was super creepy towards Buxley…

She was a very minor character at first, but people began to request her to appear more often and so Walker increased her appearances, and most of them involved her essentially being a ditzy blonde who wore revealing clothing that was there for Halftrack to ogle at…

However, as the 1970s ended, Walker began to get a lot of criticism over his depiction of Buxley.

At first, Walker tried to lean into it, by even coming out with a book in 1982 about the criticism over Huxley…

However, papers began to receive so much criticism that they began to pull strips that had Huxley in them and some even dropped the strip entirely.

So in 1984, Walker altered Buxley’s look, making her wear a less form-fitting dress (Either black or red) that was not low cut. That’s been her look ever since.

However, the jokes continued to be about Halftrack lusting after Buxley.

Walker would also sell naked drawings of Buxley to people up until the early 1990s!

Finally, in the 1990s, Walker had had enough pressure over the issue that he had Halftrack attend sensitivity training and the jokes changed going forward.

Even in recent years, though, there has been more than a few jokes about Buxley’s appearance…

Mostly, though, she’s just there to be Beetle’s girlfriend.


Check out my latest Movie Legends Revealed – Did the Wachowskis risk their entire initial budget for the Matrix on just the opening scene to get Warner Bros. to fund a bigger budget?


Part 3 will be up soon! Feel free to write in with suggestions for future legends to either cronb01@aol.com or brianc@cbr.com!

The post Comic Legends: How Beetle Bailey Was Forced to Transform Miss Buxley appeared first on CBR.

That Time Moondragon Cured Quicksilver of All His Prejudices

That Time Moondragon Cured Quicksilver of All His Prejudices

In every installment of Abandoned Love we will be examining comic book stories, plots and ideas that were abandoned by a later writer without actively retconnng away the previous story. Feel free to e-mail me at brianc@cbr.com if you have any suggestions for future editions of this feature.

Today, based on a suggestion from reader Steve S., we see how Marvel erased Quicksilver’s prejudice towards his sister’s husband, Vision…and how it eventually came back!

Now, do note that Quicksilver being overprotective of his sister has been something that has gone on for the entire existence of Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch, back to their time together in the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants before they reformed and joined the Avengers.

However, Quicksilver was never anything but cordial to his teammate, The VIsion, even as the Vision and the Scarlet Witch slowly worked towards a love for each other. To wit, when Scarlet Witch stormed off in Avengers #102 after being irked at the Vision, Quicksilver even tells Vision to talk to her…

The Scarlet Witch would then be captured by Sentinels while by herself. The Avengers tried to save her, while Quicksilver ran his own investigation. He ended up almost dying while on his solo mission to save her (meanwhile, the Avengers were saving her without him).

While he was missing, Scarlet Witch and Vision finally declared their love for each other. In Avengers #110 (by which time Steve Englehart had taken over writing duties on the title from Roy Thomas), the Avengers learn that Quicksilver is alive, but he is not happy about his sister’s new relationship…

Even at his wedding, he continues to be a jerk about it…

Vision and Scarlet Witch just ignore him and get married anyways. He continues to be a jerk.

Well, finally, in Avengers #176, Jim Shooter decided to move past this plot point, so he just abandoned it by having Moondragon literally wipe the prejudice from his brain (David Michelinie scripted it)…

And sure enough, a few years later, when Quicksilver and Crystal had a child, Quicksilver was super nice to the Vision…

So how did things change? Well, simply put, Englehart returned to the character. In the followup series to the first Vision and Scarlet Witch series, Crystal cheats on Quicksilver with a neighbor of the Vision and Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver can’t forgive her…

And soon, in West Coast Avengers Annual #1, we see that the betrayal caused him to snap…

As you can see, the prejudiced views have returned!

He went even further later on in West Coast Avengers #34…

Then the marriage between Vision and Scarlet Witch fell apart after the Vision was taken apart by the world’s governments (who were afraid that he would try to take over the world again – he had tried to do so in an earlier storyline when he was infected by the Eternals’ computer, Isaac), so there wasn’t much chance for Quicksilver to be prejudice about the issue since.

Thanks to Steve for the suggestion! If anyone else has a suggestion of an interesting abandoned comic book plot, drop me a line at brianc@cbr.com!

The post That Time Moondragon Cured Quicksilver of All His Prejudices appeared first on CBR.

When Did the Justice League Show Martian Manhunter’s Full Powers?

When Did the Justice League Show Martian Manhunter’s Full Powers?

In “When We First Met”, we spotlight the various characters, phrases, objects or events that eventually became notable parts of comic lore, like the first time someone said, “Avengers Assemble!” or the first appearance of Batman’s giant penny or the first appearance of Alfred Pennyworth or the first time Spider-Man’s face was shown half-Spidey/half-Peter. Stuff like that.

Reader Paul S. wrote in to ask:

I was raised in the ‘60’s and was a fan of the Martian Manhunter and followed him in House of Mystery whenever I could find that book. So, here is my question(s):

1. I knew from the House of Mystery books that the Martian Manhunter could change his shape/looks, turn invisible, read minds and also become intangible. I never saw those 4 abilities used in any of the Justice League stories, or did I just miss that? So, in what Justice League issue did the Martian Manhunter first use those abilities.

2. Why was the Martian Manhunter, since he was presented as more of a weaker version of Superman in those early Justice League issues, not shown to use his abilities since they were watering down Superman and Batman’s involvement as you pointed out in one of your earlier columns?

I’ll tackle these questions in the reverse order.

Before I specifically address the questions, though, let’s take a look at what Paul is talking about, in the context of the first appearance of the Justice League in Brave and the Bold #28 (by Gardner Fox, Mike Sekowsky and Bernard Sachs)….

As you can see, the Martian Manhunter’s powers in this sample are basically how his powers were presented throughout his initial tenure with the Justice League. In effect, he was treated as a slightly less powerful version of Superman. He would use flight, super strength, martian vision (which would work like Superman’s visions) and Martian breath. And he had a weakness to fire. That would be how he was written pretty much precisely through the eight years that Gardner Fox wrote him as a regular member of the Justice League.

This, then, goes to Paul’s question, which is “Why did Gardner Fox write him this way?” And I think that it’s simply a matter of how the League (or any team-up book) was written back then. Comic book writers did not have a whole ton of reference material back in the old days. At the same time, Gardner Fox had never written an Martian Manhunter story prior to the introduction of the Justice League and it is likely that Fox did not have all that much of a familiarity with the character.

I noticed during my recent piece about how Fox handled Superman in the early issues of the Justice League that it appeared quite clear that Fox had what you would call “go-to” plot points. You know, like a list of stuff about each character that he could use in the stories. Characters that Fox was more familiar with, like Flash and Green Lantern (or Snapper Carr, a Fox creation) tended to have more diversity in how Fox depicted them. However, characters like Martian Manhunter and Superman, who Fox would only write in the pages of the Justice League, had less diversity in their depictions – they were, instead, quite rigid. So I think that Martian Manhunter was treated this way because that’s really all that Fox knew about him.

Okay, so let’s see how long it took for J’onn’s various other major abilities (his shape-shifting abilities, his telepathy, his invisibility and his intangibility) to show up in the Justice League! Some of them took literally decades!

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The post When Did the Justice League Show Martian Manhunter’s Full Powers? appeared first on CBR.

Comic Legends: What Was Captain America’s Original Name?

Comic Legends: What Was Captain America’s Original Name?

Welcome to Comic Book Legends Revealed! This is the six hundred and sixty-third week where we examine comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

As always, there will be three different posts for each legend this week!

COMIC LEGEND:

Joe Simon originally named Captain America something else entirely.

STATUS:

I’m Going With True

The early 1940s were a fascinating time. The comic book superhero boom was well under way, and comic book publishers were fighting each other to get to the next great superhero idea. The top creators in the industry were suddenly very hot commodities, as everyone wanted to get a piece of the next great idea that, say, Will Eisner came up with (actually, by early 1941, Will Eisner was in SUCH high demand that he was able to leave the normal comic book industry entirely to launch a new character, the Spirit, as a newspaper supplement).

Logically, then, it was a good time for people to pair up as content deliverers, and that is just what artist/editor/writer Joe Simon did with Jack Kirby, one of the most promising new artist talents in the industry. Simon quickly paired up with Kirby and they began developing new ideas.

People sometimes forget that Joe Simon was an artist, as well. Obviously, he soon left most of the art duties on their breakout character to Jack Kirby, but Simon was an artist, also, and it was actually Simon who would come up with the initial design for their star character – the character that would change their careers dramatically over the next few years – Captain America!

Here’s the original sketch that Simon did of the character that he then pitched to Timely Comics publisher Martin Goodman…

To say that people at this time were trodding a lot of the same ground would be a HUGE understatement, as whenever someone had a new idea, five other publishers would try to knock it off. Patriotic superheroes were suddenly very hot and MLJ (now Archie Comics) got ahead of everyone with The Shield…

But now Simon and Kirby were right there with them with a new creation, who was an instant success when he came out at the end of 1940.

The sketch was even worked into the first page of the comic (which was mostly drawn by Kirby)…

However, originally, Simon had a whole other idea of where to go with the character.

He later recalled, “I wrote the name ‘Super American’ at the bottom of the page,” but he then reconsidered, noting, “No, it didn’t work. There were too many ‘Supers’ around. ‘Captain America’ had a good sound to it. There weren’t a lot of captains in comics. It was as easy as that.”

Of course, one of the hottest superheroes around at the time WAS a Captain, though, Captain Marvel, so that likely was not a coincidence.

Amusingly enough, six months later, a comic book company came out with, sure enough, Super American!!

He did not last as long as Captain America did, oddly enough.


Check out some legends from Legends Revealed:

Did Sigourney Weaver Actually Make a Shocking Trick Shot in Alien Resurrection?

Did Larry David Base the Famous “George Quits His Job and Then Pretends He Didn’t” Seinfeld Episode on Something That Happened to Him at SNL?

Was “December, 1963 (Oh What a Night)” Originally Written About Prohibition?

Did Stephen King’s Wife Fish Carrie Out of the Trash and Compel Her Husband to Finish the Novel?


Check back Saturday for part 2 of this week’s legends!

And remember, if you have a legend that you’re curious about, drop me a line at either brianc@cbr.com or cronb01@aol.com!

The post Comic Legends: What Was Captain America’s Original Name? appeared first on CBR.

Line it is Drawn: The Real Superhero Wedding of the Century!

Line it is Drawn: The Real Superhero Wedding of the Century!

Welcome to Line it is Drawn, our weekly gallery of amazing art by our great collection of artistic talent, all working from your suggestions!

So every week, I post a topic here. You reply to it on the CSBG Twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply), our artists will each pick one of your suggestions and I will post their drawings based on your suggestions here every week. So every week you will have a new question and you will see the choices picked from the previous week.

To qualify, you have to be following @csbg when you reply – so go follow us and then give your answer to the following question/challenge (All suggestions due by 11:59 Pacific Friday).

The topic for the next Line is…

With the Super Bowl happening next week, let’s see some SUPERhero SUPER Bowl Ads! Tell us a superhero and a product and our artists will come up with an ad for that product starring that superhero.

Read on for the drawings that came about courtesy of the last question/challenge!

In honor of the announcement of Kitty Pryde and Colossus’ impending wedding, suggest ideas for THE TRUE COMIC BOOK WEDDING OF THE CENTURY!

Enjoy!

I’ll put them in aphabetical order based on the name of the Twitter user who made the suggestion.

All copyright and trademarks of the following characters are held by their respective owners.

BigMike20X6 suggested

Gwenpool and Kick-Ass

This drawing is by Simone Placchi. His website is here.

BigMike20X6, ErichMees, GraveWriting and KeithAlanMorgan suggested

Thanos and Death

This drawing is by Chris Simmonds. His website is here.

CyberVenom2001 suggested

Cap and Iron Man settle their Civil War differences with a Civil Union!

The art for this one is by Paul Shinn. His website is here.

leokearon suggested

Scarlet Witch and Vision

Brendan Tobin drew this one. Here is his website.

LordAndrew suggested

Spider-Man and Black Cat

The art for this one is by Matt Sandbrook. His website is here.

LordAndrew suggested

Batwoman and Silver Age Batwoman

Nick Perks is the artist for this one. Here is his website.

LordAndrew suggested

Black Widow and Bucky

Axel Medellin drew this one. His website is here

LordAndrew suggested

Captain America and Peggy Carter

This drawing is by Carina Guevara. Her website is here.

LordAndrew suggested

Rogue and Gambit

This drawing is by Jean Sinclair. His website is here.

TheCountingTree suggested

Charlie Brown and Lucy Van Pelt

A visiting Caanan Grall (his first visit in over a year – and we’re happy to have him!) is the artist for this one. Here is his website

TheCountingTree suggested

Starro and Star Sapphire

Nick Perks is also the artist for this one. Here is his website.

therealAstrozac suggested

The Savage Dragon and She Hulk

The art for this one is by David Duke. His website is here.

What romance this week, artists! Great work!

Okay, folks, go get to Twitter to see our artists shilling!

The post Line it is Drawn: The Real Superhero Wedding of the Century! appeared first on CBR.

Supervillains Sure Do Fall in Love With Storm A Lot, Don’t They?

Supervillains Sure Do Fall in Love With Storm A Lot, Don’t They?

In Drawing Crazy Patterns, I spotlight at least five scenes/moments from within comic book stories that fit under a specific theme (basically, stuff that happens frequently in comics). Today, we look at how supervillains kept falling in love with Storm! Or at least villains who saw her as being their consort!

In a way, you could argue that this trope began with Arkon in X-Men Annual #3, and I guess you could see it that way, but I dunno. First off, Arkon doesn’t really seem to present the situation as being one where he is looking for a queen or a consort. He just needs Storm for her abilities. After all, he came looking for Thor to begin with and just settled for Storm, so I don’t think that the story necessarily counts for a list like this. Secondly, and I think most importantly, Arkon clearly ISN’T a villain in the issue, as he’s just trying to save his world. He’s a darn near HERO in the story! So while people often lump Arkon in with the rest of them in the whole “People who fell for Storm” (heck, I think even Claremont has once referenced Arkon in that context), I don’t think he fits.

Therefore, our first example comes in X-Men #145 (by Chris Claremont, Dave Cockrum and Joe Rubinstein), where Storm shows up at Doctor Doom’s castle to, oddly enough, rescue Arcade, as he has captured people close to the X-Men to force them to save him from Doom. Doom wines and dines Storm…

When things get down to brass tacks, however, Doom quickly imprisons Storm by encasing her in chrome. Can you imagine how freaked out a claustrophobic person would be if they were entirely encased in metal? Well, you don’t have to imagine it as you can see it in this story, as Storm freaks the heck out and turns into a sort of crazed version of herself.

In the end, she is calmed down and Doom mentions how he wishes that their time together went differently…

Do note that in this same story, Doom also has a Storm robot serve him. Which is super-creepy any way that you slice it, but particularly creepy when he’s all, “Storm, I think you’re neat.” I love how Storm says that Doom has a blank slate with her. Lady, he’s totally a murdering psychopath!! It’s also important to note that John Byrne later revealed that this Doom was actually a Doom-bot (amusingly, Al Ewing later revealed that it WASN’T).

Next up is a pretty straightforward situation, as Uncanny X-Men #159 (by Chris Claremont, Bill Sienkiewicz and Bob Wiacek) has Dracula show up and try to turn Storm into his consort…

This story is the basis for the Bloodstorm character who showed up in Mutant X (and is now part of X-Men: Blue).

In the first appearance of the Shadow King, we learn that he had taken over the body of a guy named Amahl Farouk (well, actually, it is a bit unclear whether Amahl Farouk WAS the Shadow King or not. It wasn’t until later that it was clear that the Shadow King and Amahl Farouk were two different entities). Storm had crossed paths with Amahl Farouk when she was a young child (back when she was picking pockets in Cairo as a kid).

Years later, the Shadow King possessed Karma of the New Mutants and made her super fat and then used his powers to make Storm his consort, even while he was still within Karma’s body, as shown here in New Mutants #34 (by Chris Claremont and Steve Leialoha)…

Go to the next page for the last two examples…

Page 2:

The post Supervillains Sure Do Fall in Love With Storm A Lot, Don’t They? appeared first on CBR.

Did Superman Ever Meet the Green Lantern Who Failed to Save Krypton?

Did Superman Ever Meet the Green Lantern Who Failed to Save Krypton?

Comic Book Questions Answered – where I answer whatever questions you folks might have about comic books (feel free to e-mail questions to me at brianc@cbr.com).

Reader Richard H. wrote in to ask:

Has Superman ever confronted Tomar Re, the green Lantern in charge of the sector Krypton when it blew up?

Richard, of course, is referring to something that I did an article on a while back (he’s not referencing my article, but I just mean that he’s referencing the same thing I wrote about), which was how Tomar-Re, who was the very first alien Green Lantern that Hal Jordan met after becoming a Green Lantern (as opposed to the dying alien Hal met right away – various reboots have changed it so that Hal has met other Green Lanterns first. I thiiiiiiiiiiiink that the current continuity says that he met Sinestro first) was the Green Lantern assigned to the Sector with Krypton in it!

In Superman #257, Elliot S! Maggin (based on a story idea by Neal Adams) did a story with artists Dick Dillin and Dick Giordano showing Tomar-Re about the retire from the Green Lantern Corps. However, before he could retire, he had to first confront his greatest failure…or was it a failure after all?!?

Tomar-Re, you see, had figured out a way to save Krypton, but it just seemed as though fate had another thing in mind for him that tragic day…

So Tomar-Re is naturally all super sad. But not so fast, Tomar-Re! The Guardians explain to him that it was his failure that ended up giving the universe Superman and that trade-off was more than worth letting that planet die!

Their logic is more than a little bit dubious there, but hey, at least Tomar-Re doesn’t feel like a total jerk. The Guardians don’t usually concern themselves with making their Green Lanterns feel better, so they must have been huge fans of Tomar-Re to go out of their way to make him feel better about the whole Krypton deal.

Okay, so that was 1972. Tomar-Re was killed off in an odd story during Crisis on Infinite Earths (he gives his ring to John Stewart, who, in turn, gives the ring he got from Hal Jordan back to Hal Jordan). Did Tomar-Re ever happen to run into Superman before that time? Read on to find out!

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