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Archive for October 2012 – Page 2

Sherlock Director And Benedict Cumberbatch Reunite For Brian Epstein Movie

One of the many people to be called ‘the fifth Beatle’ was the band’s manager, Brian Epstein. He seems to be in vogue at the moment, with Vivek Tiwary producing a new comic and film about the man – called The Fifth Beatle, in fact – and now Tom Hanks‘ company Playtone announcing their own movie about the man.

This latter project is to reunite Sherlock director Paul Maguigan and star Benedict Cumberbatch, who will be playing Epstein.

The best film about Epstein I’ve seen to date is The Hours and the Times, but that’s a pretty compressed picture, and arguably not a presentation of the real man. Taking place over a single weekend it hypothesises a romantic encounter between Epstein and John Lennon. With the broader audience it’s possibly most remembered for being the first time Ian Hart played Lennon.

The film has been written by Todd Graff, perpetrator of the truly diabolical Joyful Noise. Playtone have a pretty good tagline for the story they’re trying to tell, calling Epstein:

the man who threw the biggest party of the 1960s but ultimately forgot to invite himself.

The film is eaking finance at AFM right now and wouldn’t get rolling until after Maguigan and Cumberbatch are done with the next series of Sherlock.


George Lucas To Spend His New Billions On Education. No, Not His Own

George Lucas has just been outed as a very grand philanthropist. A spokesperson for Lucasfilm have told The Hollywood Reporter that “the bulk” $4 billion of Lucas’ payday for signing his empire over to Disney will be paid into a charitable foundation focused primarily on educational issues.

Well, mental high five, George. You’ve done good.

Lucas issued a statement in 2010 with a pledge to support education. It’s this he’s now actually following through with, and to an even greater tune than he could manage before – and let’s be honest, he’s not been short of a bob or two for a good while now.

Here’s the full text of what Lucas said:

Storytellers are teachers and communicators who speak a universal language. That was Homer’s primary role, and both Plato and Aristotle used narratives and dialogues as a means of educating. Good storytelling is based on truths and insights, and a good storyteller is ultimately a teacher – using the arts as a means of making education emotionally meaningful. These are all tools at our educational system’s disposal, but too often we aren’t making use of them.

When I was in high school, I felt like I was in a vacuum, biding time. I was curious, but bored. It was not an atmosphere conducive to learning. I was fortunate that I found my path and my language.

It’s scary to think of our education system as little better than an assembly line with producing diplomas as its only goal.  Once I had the means to effect change in this arena, it became my passion to do so – to promote active, life-long learning.  I believe in the artisan school of learning, through apprenticeships and Aristotelian questions and discussion. This level of engagement dates back to the beginning of human life, but it’s still the best way of doing things. There have to be universal standards – particularly in education – and while it
seems unwieldy, there is a willingness among educators to share their best practices.

Ultimately, that is why I created Edutopia and the George Lucas Educational Foundation.

The focus of GLEF has been to share educational innovations – cooperative and project learning, mentorship, parental involvement, and technological advances. This all comes straight from those on the front lines, from teachers who are putting these methods into practice. We are the facilitators. Our goal has been to showcase bold
successes and inspire others to further increase the appetite for education. Our hope is that administrators, teachers, and parents will see the power of these collective efforts and join the fight for wider
reforms.

But reform is just the beginning. We need to build new foundations, fostering independent thought and a desire to keep learning. Our students need to come away with more than just survival skills, and more than just what is required to complete the program. We need to promote critical thinking and emotional intelligence. We need to focus
on building an education system that promotes different types of learning, different types of development, and different types of assessment. We have an opportunity and an obligation to prepare our children for the real world, for dealing with others in practical, project-based environments. It’s about working together and building character – being compassionate, empathetic, and civil as a means to a greater end.

As technology changes, so do students. So should classrooms, and so should our methods of teaching. In a few short years, connectivity has gone from a technological novelty to a daily necessity. It’s how our culture communicates, and our children are at the forefront of its use. Understanding those tools – and how to integrate them into learning – is an integral step in defining our future.

My pledge is to the process; as long as I have the resources at my disposal, I will seek to raise the bar for future generations of students of all ages.

I am dedicating the majority of my wealth to improving education.  It is the key to the survival of the human race.  We have to plan for our collective future – and the first step begins with the social, emotional, and intellectual tools we provide to our children.  As humans, our greatest tool for survival is our ability to think and to
adapt – as educators, storytellers, and communicators our responsibility is to continue to do so.

How long until some cynic questions what Lucas might mean by “majority” I wonder? Well, how long does it take somebody to click over to the Bleeding Cool forums…


George Lucas To Spend His New Billions On Education. No, Not His Own

George Lucas has just been outed as a very grand philanthropist. A spokesperson for Lucasfilm have told The Hollywood Reporter that “the bulk” $4 billion of Lucas’ payday for signing his empire over to Disney will be paid into a charitable foundation focused primarily on educational issues.

Well, mental high five, George. You’ve done good.

Lucas issued a statement in 2010 with a pledge to support education. It’s this he’s now actually following through with, and to an even greater tune than he could manage before – and let’s be honest, he’s not been short of a bob or two for a good while now.

Here’s the full text of what Lucas said:

Storytellers are teachers and communicators who speak a universal language. That was Homer’s primary role, and both Plato and Aristotle used narratives and dialogues as a means of educating. Good storytelling is based on truths and insights, and a good storyteller is ultimately a teacher – using the arts as a means of making education emotionally meaningful. These are all tools at our educational system’s disposal, but too often we aren’t making use of them.

When I was in high school, I felt like I was in a vacuum, biding time. I was curious, but bored. It was not an atmosphere conducive to learning. I was fortunate that I found my path and my language.

It’s scary to think of our education system as little better than an assembly line with producing diplomas as its only goal.  Once I had the means to effect change in this arena, it became my passion to do so – to promote active, life-long learning.  I believe in the artisan school of learning, through apprenticeships and Aristotelian questions and discussion. This level of engagement dates back to the beginning of human life, but it’s still the best way of doing things. There have to be universal standards – particularly in education – and while it
seems unwieldy, there is a willingness among educators to share their best practices.

Ultimately, that is why I created Edutopia and the George Lucas Educational Foundation.

The focus of GLEF has been to share educational innovations – cooperative and project learning, mentorship, parental involvement, and technological advances. This all comes straight from those on the front lines, from teachers who are putting these methods into practice. We are the facilitators. Our goal has been to showcase bold
successes and inspire others to further increase the appetite for education. Our hope is that administrators, teachers, and parents will see the power of these collective efforts and join the fight for wider
reforms.

But reform is just the beginning. We need to build new foundations, fostering independent thought and a desire to keep learning. Our students need to come away with more than just survival skills, and more than just what is required to complete the program. We need to promote critical thinking and emotional intelligence. We need to focus
on building an education system that promotes different types of learning, different types of development, and different types of assessment. We have an opportunity and an obligation to prepare our children for the real world, for dealing with others in practical, project-based environments. It’s about working together and building character – being compassionate, empathetic, and civil as a means to a greater end.

As technology changes, so do students. So should classrooms, and so should our methods of teaching. In a few short years, connectivity has gone from a technological novelty to a daily necessity. It’s how our culture communicates, and our children are at the forefront of its use. Understanding those tools – and how to integrate them into learning – is an integral step in defining our future.

My pledge is to the process; as long as I have the resources at my disposal, I will seek to raise the bar for future generations of students of all ages.

I am dedicating the majority of my wealth to improving education.  It is the key to the survival of the human race.  We have to plan for our collective future – and the first step begins with the social, emotional, and intellectual tools we provide to our children.  As humans, our greatest tool for survival is our ability to think and to
adapt – as educators, storytellers, and communicators our responsibility is to continue to do so.

How long until some cynic questions what Lucas might mean by “majority” I wonder? Well, how long does it take somebody to click over to the Bleeding Cool forums…


First Trailer For Decay, Zombie Movie Actually Filmed Inside CERN

Worried that the large hadron collider is going to create a black hole that will suck up the solar system? You might as well worry that it’s going to create zombies.

The second of those deeply implausible ideas is the basis for Decay, a new horror picture that was actually filmed inside CERN. It’s a low budget affair but this trailer actually has a pretty nice look:

Speaking to Wired, the film’s director, Luke Thompson, has admitted that CERN’s officials don’t endorse the film. Not exactly – but they are going to let him release it.

And what a release. The film is set to be offered up within the next few weeks as a free download under a creative commons license. Thankfully, the budget was only just a little over $3000.

I’m looking forward to seeing the film, not least for its promised:

satirical commentary on various aspects of people’s perceptions of science


First Trailer For Decay, Zombie Movie Actually Filmed Inside CERN

Worried that the large hadron collider is going to create a black hole that will suck up the solar system? You might as well worry that it’s going to create zombies.

The second of those deeply implausible ideas is the basis for Decay, a new horror picture that was actually filmed inside CERN. It’s a low budget affair but this trailer actually has a pretty nice look:

Speaking to Wired, the film’s director, Luke Thompson, has admitted that CERN’s officials don’t endorse the film. Not exactly – but they are going to let him release it.

And what a release. The film is set to be offered up within the next few weeks as a free download under a creative commons license. Thankfully, the budget was only just a little over $3000.

I’m looking forward to seeing the film, not least for its promised:

satirical commentary on various aspects of people’s perceptions of science


First Footage From Warm Bodies With Nicholas Hoult

A timely tutorial in the secrets of zombie make-up has provided Summit Entertainment with a promotional opportunity for their upcoming Zombie thriller-romantic-drama-comedy-thing, Warm Bodies.

They haven’t exactly seized the opportunity with both hands, mind. More like one finger.

Check out the first online footage of Nicholas Hoult as R, the romeo of the undead, at the start of this video.

What was that? Three seconds? Four?

Warm Bodies was directed by Jonathan Levine, last responsible for 50/50. I really want it to be good.


First Footage From Warm Bodies With Nicholas Hoult

A timely tutorial in the secrets of zombie make-up has provided Summit Entertainment with a promotional opportunity for their upcoming Zombie thriller-romantic-drama-comedy-thing, Warm Bodies.

They haven’t exactly seized the opportunity with both hands, mind. More like one finger.

Check out the first online footage of Nicholas Hoult as R, the romeo of the undead, at the start of this video.

What was that? Three seconds? Four?

Warm Bodies was directed by Jonathan Levine, last responsible for 50/50. I really want it to be good.


The Rock Is The Hulk For Hallowe’en

Dwayne Johnson tweets;

“Don’t make angry. You wouldn’t like me when I’m angry” ~ The People’s Hulk #HappyHalloween


The Rock Is The Hulk For Hallowe’en

Dwayne Johnson tweets;

“Don’t make angry. You wouldn’t like me when I’m angry” ~ The People’s Hulk #HappyHalloween


Feige Commends Ben Kingsley’s Mandarin

Last week, we got our first glimpse at Ben Kingsley's Mandarin in Iron Man 3. Since then, Marvel Studios boss and Iron Man 3 producer Kevin Feige has praised Kingsley's performance, noting that his interpretation of the character has helped to reinvigorate the franchise.

"On his last take of his first full day as the Mandarin, when they yelled 'Cut!' the entire crew burst into applause, spearheaded by Mr. Downey himself," Feige told Total Film. "It was pretty amazing to see that."

Continue reading…